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  1. #1
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    Yard and Backyard Vocabulary Word List


    A
    awning
    B
    back porch
    back stoop
    backyard
    basketball hoop
    bench
    birdbath
    bulbs
    bush
    C
    carport
    compost bin
    D
    doghouse
    downspout
    driveway
    E
    edger
    F
    fence
    flower
    flowerbed
    flower garden
    front porch
    front stoop
    fruit tree
    G
    garage
    garbage can
    garden
    garden path
    gate
    grass
    gutter
    H
    hammock
    hedges
    herb garden
    hoe
    hose
    hummingbird feeder
    L
    land
    lawn
    lawnmower
    O
    orchard
    P
    path
    patio
    patio furniture
    planter
    plant pot
    pond
    pool
    porch
    porch swing
    R
    rake
    rocks
    S
    shed
    shovel
    shrub
    sod
    soil
    sprinkler
    stepping stone
    stoop
    swimming pool
    swing
    T
    terrace
    trampoline
    trash can
    tree
    V
    vegetable garden
    vine
    W
    wading pool
    walkway
    weeds
    welcome mat
    Y
    yard


    Article 1:

    You can make this wonderful twig house using a cardboard box, twigs, and hot glue.

    This is a really wonderful project that makes a small log cabin that you can play with for years. This project takes a lot of time and effort to make, but it is more than worth it. It also uses a lot of glue and a lot of twigs. We worked for about an hour or two a day for 5 days to make two cabins. This project requires adult help and supervision (adults should cut the cardboard, use the hot glue gun, and cut the twigs).
    Supplies:
    • A small cardboard box (we used ones about 9 inches by 12 inches by 9 inches)
    • A sheet of cardboard (for the roof)
    • Hot glue (you'll need a lot)
    • Craft knife (to cut the cardboard)
    • Garden shears (to cut the twigs)
    • A lot of twigs (choose the straightest ones you can find)
    • Pencil
    • Optional: Acetate (for the windows)
    • Optional: Tiny pebbles and a tiny box (for a chimney)
    Mark the cardboard box so that it looks like a house. For a traditional-style house, make the shorter sides have triangle tops, and cut the longer sides to meet the short ends.Cut the cardboard along your markings, making a house shape.
    Mark the doors and windows. Cut out the windows. Cut only three sides of each door (leave one long side to act as the door's hinge).Optional - Cut small squares of acetate that fit around each window. Glue the acetate on each window to look like glass.
    Measure, cut and glue twigs to the box. Use hot glue - liquid glue does not work well in this project. The only tricky part is by the hinge of the doors - don't glue twigs too close to the door hinge or the door won't open all the way.
    To finish the doors, glue on smaller twigs. For a doorknob, use a very short twig.
    For the roof, cut a rectangle of cardboard that is about an inch longer and wider than the top of the house. Fold the rectangle in half. Place the roof on the house.
    Optional: If you want a chimney on your cabin, find a small box (like a macaroni mix box). Cut it in half and cut off the ends of the box. Cut out a triangle on each of the short sides (this is where the chimney will fit along the top of the roof). Glue the box to the top of the roof.Glue tiny pebbles to the box.
    Glue twigs to the roof.You now have a fantastic log cabin. You can decorate the inside of the cabin, and even make tiny twig furniture.

    (Source: EnchantedLearning)

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    Last edited by Aisti-; Jun 21, 2013 at 01:02 PM.

  2. #2
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    Article 2.
    How to Build and Install Raised Garden Beds


    For the experienced gardener or the novice, raised garden beds take the hassle out of horticulture. Here are tips on planning, building, protecting and irrigating raised bed gardens.

    Experienced gardeners use raised beds to sidestep a long list of gardening challenges. These controlled experiments in plant parenthood are so easy, in fact, that they're also well-suited to novices picking up a shovel for the first time.

    Bad dirt is out, because you fill a raised bed with a customized soil-and-compost blend. Drainage is built into the bed walls, which hold the soil in place to keep erosion in check. Greater exposure to the sun warms the bed, which allows more plant diversity and extends the growing season. Plants can be spaced closely together, so yields go up, water-use efficiency is maximized and weeds are crowded out. Finally, raising the soil level by even a foot reduces the back-bending effort needed for jobs such as planting, weeding and harvesting.

    Beyond the ease is the control—as you grow your favorite foods, you feed and soak your plants with just what they need for optimum growth.

    A raised bed is most productive and attractive as a bottomless frame set into a shallow trench. The sides can be almost any durable building material, including rock, brick, concrete and interlocking blocks. Watering troughs or claw-foot tubs can work, as long as they have the capacity and drainage.

    But by far the most common material for raised beds is lumber. The major caveat, since raised beds are often used to grow edibles, is to steer clear of wood preserved with toxins. Avoid creosote-treated railroad ties; opt instead for naturally rot-resistant cedar or redwood. The EPA considers wood infused with alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) to be safe for food crops, but if you use this pressure-treated wood you may want to line the bed interior with landscape fabric—an air-and-water-permeable screen—to prevent soil contact. Whether using pressure-treated or naturally rot-resistant wood, put the bed together with galvanized or stainless screws or bolts.

    Location, Location

    A 3 x 6-ft bed should be wide enough to support sprawling tomatoes, but narrow enough to reach easily from both sides. The ideal height is 1 to 2 ft tall—you can go taller, but you need a considerable amount of soil to fill a 3-ft-high bed. Don't fill the bed with dirt from the garden. Instead, use peat moss, compost or a soil mix for planters. Use a 2 x 4 to level the soil, then plant. If possible, build more than one bed, which makes it easier to rotate crops and meet the watering needs of specific plants. Aligning beds in straight rows simplifies the installation of an irrigation system.

    Finding a flat spot spares a lot of digging—you want the walls to be level. In general, a north-south orientation takes full advantage of available light. Stay close to the kitchen, but avoid sites shaded by the house or beneath messy trees. Leave at least 18 in. between beds for walkways, or 2 ft if you need room for a wheelbarrow or lawnmower.

    Planning, Building

    To prepare the site, get rid of turf and weeds. Outline the bed dimensions on the ground with chalkline or string, then dig with vertical strokes along the outline, just deep enough to bury about half of your first course of lumber. Raised beds are designed so water trickles down, eliminating most of the problem of poor drainage. But if your only viable location is bogged in a marsh, you can prevent the "bathtub effect" by digging a few inches deeper and putting a layer of coarse stone or pea gravel in the excavation. (You can also install perforated drainage pipes in trenches under or around the bed, or just drill weep holes at the base of the sides.) Likewise, if there is no turf between your beds, put down some landscape fabric and cover it with pavers or a layer of gravel to improve drainage—after running out in the rain for a fresh bell pepper, you'll appreciate the mud-free shoes.

    Level the earth or gravel layer at the bottom of the bed, then put down a layer of weed-suppressing landscape fabric that extends to the outer edge of the wooden frame. Now is also the time to think about pest control. "The rich soil in a raised bed has worms and other delicacies that attract moles, and gophers and voles relish young veggie roots," Sausalito, Calif., garden designer Tom Wilhite says. "To keep out burrowing pests I always recommend a bottom layer of hardware cloth"—a mesh grid of steel or galvanized metal.

    Build each wall separately, then fasten them together and put the bed into position. Raised-bed builders often sink posts into the ground for stability, either at the inside corners of the bed or halfway along the side walls. These help hold the bed in place, but can also reduce the outward pressure that a full bed exerts on the frame, which can dislodge the lumber after a single season. A cap railing that runs around the top of the bed ties everything together. Plus, it provides a handy place to set down gardening tools while working, or, when you're done, a seat to admire the fruits of your labor. Bed covers ward off insects and keep plants warm in cool weather.


    Greenhouse Effect

    A simple framework of hoops and a lightweight cover can extend your growing season in cool areas, conserve moisture in dry areas and protect plants from birds or insects. Use galvanized pipe straps to mount 1-in. PVC pipe inside the bed walls. Cut ½-in. flexible PVC tubing twice as long as the beds' width. Bend it, mount it and clip a cover in place. Use clear polyethylene film to raise soil and air temperatures in early spring or fall—to get an early start on heirloom tomatoes, for instance, or to try your hand at exotic squashes. But be careful not to bake your plants on warmer days. Remove the cover or slit vents in it to avoid excessive heat buildup. For pest control, cover the bed with bird netting or with gauzelike fabrics known as floating row covers, which keep out flying insects but let in both light and air.


    Once you add an automatic watering system to your raised-bed garden, you're free to plant, weed and harvest. A simple micro-irrigation setup ensures that plants get water consistently—especially important for seedlings and leaf crops such as lettuce. "The sides of raised beds heat up quickly in the sun, baking the moisture out of the soil," Wilhite says. "Irrigation delivers the water evenly and gently. You can set your timer to water early in the morning—less will evaporate, and you resist disease."

    A basic setup starts with a faucet or hose-bib attachment that is essentially a series of valves that prevent back flow into the plumbing, filter the water and control the water pressure.

    These valves are designed with 1-in. or ¾-in. connections. From these, attach supply lines of flexible ½-in. poly tubing. The tubing's accessibility makes it easy to check for leaks and repair damage from punctures or bursts. To protect the tubing, bury it a few inches and cover the line with mulch.

    Lay the tubing along the beds in lines 12 in. apart. Fit sections together with compression elbow and T-fittings. Install drip emitters at 12-in. intervals along the length of the tubing for even delivery of moisture to plants. Low-volume sprayers or misters on risers can also be used, but these lose more water to evaporation. Close the ends of each line with hose-end plugs and caps. Then sit back and let the system water for you.

    (Source: Popular Mechanics)



    Last edited by Aisti-; Jun 23, 2013 at 01:07 AM.

  3. #3
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    Winter Vocabulary Word List

    A
    anorak
    arctic
    B
    balaclava
    below zero
    beret
    biting
    bitter cold
    black ice
    blanket
    bleak
    blizzard
    blustery
    boots
    brisk
    C
    cap
    chill
    chills
    chilly
    chimney
    coat
    cocoon
    cold
    cold snap
    comforter
    cough
    curling
    D
    December
    dog sled
    down coat
    drafty
    dreary
    duvet
    E
    earflap hat
    earmuffs
    eggnog
    evergreen
    F
    February
    fire
    fireplace
    firewood
    flannel
    fleece
    flu
    flurries
    fog
    freezing
    freezing rain
    frigid
    frostbite
    frostbitten
    frosty
    frozen
    fruitcake
    furnace
    G
    gale
    gingerbread
    gingerbread house
    gingerbread man
    glacial
    gingerbread woman
    glacier
    gloves
    gust
    H
    hailstone
    harsh
    heat
    heater
    hibernate
    hockey
    hoodie
    hot chocolate
    hypothermia
    I
    ice
    iceberg
    ice cap
    ice crystal
    ice dam
    ice fishing
    ice hockey
    ice scraper
    ice skates
    ice storm
    icicle
    icy
    insulation
    J
    jacket
    Jack Frost (the personification of winter)
    January
    L
    lake effect
    log
    longjohns
    luge
    M
    melt
    mittens
    muffler
    N
    nippy
    nor'easter
    O
    overcast
    overcoat
    overshoes
    P
    parka
    pinecone
    polar
    pullover
    Q
    quilt
    R
    radiator
    raw
    reindeer
    S
    scarf
    shiver
    skate
    ski
    sled
    sledge
    sleet
    solstice
    slippery
    slush
    sneeze
    sniffle
    S cont.
    snow
    snowball
    snowboard
    snowbound
    snowfall
    snowflake
    snowman
    snowplow
    show shoe
    snow shovel
    snowstorm
    snowy
    socks
    storm
    stove
    sugarplum
    sweater
    T
    thaw
    thermometer
    toboggan
    turtleneck
    W
    whiteout
    wind
    wind chill factor
    windy
    winter
    wintertime
    wintry
    wood stove
    wool
    woolens
    Z
    zero degrees

    (Source: Enchanted Learning)

    [Blog: Donnallong]
    Nature in Winter: An Overview

    Pine cones


    Nature in winter is a time of struggle and beauty. Winter signals the end of a long productive year. Plants shut down. making food, animals migrate to warmer climates and humans snuggle up and stay indoors.

    After the glorious riot of color in autumn with its clear, brisk days, the quiet of winter sneaks up on us. It is a time for introspection and long quiet evenings spent at home. I like the feeling of being insulated and protected in my snug house. I like waking up to cold frosty mornings and seeing a light snow covering the trees and cars.

    But, winter is also the time of aching joints and bad colds. We live seasonally without even thinking about it. The winter is perfect time to start closely studying nature. It is easier simply because there is less stuff around. Fewer birds, fewer trees with leaves, just less going on.

    In the Winter Sky

    The Winter Solstice signals the beginning of the winter season. It occurs every year on December 21 or 22. It is the time when the sun is at its lowest point in the sky.

    Two fascinating meteor showers occur this season. The Ursids Meteor Shower occurs on Dec. 22. The Quadrantids Shower occurs every January 3rd.

    The two big constellation attractions in the night sky are Orion, thegreat hunter and Sirius the Dog Star. Orion is a magnificent star group that is easy to find. Sirius is the night sky’s most brilliant star.

    Winter is a perfect time to learn about the circumpolar star constellations. Circumpolar stars are any star that appears to circle around the Earth’s North or South Pole without either rising or setting, as a result of the motion of the Earth.

    Winter Weather

    Winter weather has the most dramatic changes.It seems one week is filled with the last balmy days of autumn to be replaced overnight with bone-chilling cold. The wind picks up and trees creak and sway in the wind. The water in pond and lakes freeze. And ice crystals form on the water surface and freeze downward. The top layer of ice serves as a protective coating for the animals in the depths below.

    When people think of nature in winter they mostly think of snow. In my neck of the woods, the Mid-Atlantic Delaware Valley, we receive big heavy snows just a couple of times every few years. Just alot of snow flurries or maybe a couple of inches. But when we are hit with Nor’easters and blizzards, the region is paralyzed. Here in Philadelphia we don’t handle snow very well. At the mere threat of a major snowstorm, supermarkets shelved are cleared of eggs, milk, bread and other food in anticipation of being snowed in for several days. A couple inches of snow is the “big news story” for the next couple of days.

    Here in the North East and Mid Atlantic region, a beautiful but very dangerous phenomena know as ice storms fall upon us in winter. This occurs when rain falls on cold surfaces and freezes as a sheet of ice. Everything is covered with ice, such as trees, cars, houses, etc. The ice covered tree limbs look like a winter wonderland, but birds, animals and humans have a hard time getting around. Ice freezes on streets and can look black like asphalt. This is the dangerous “black ice” that has caused many a accident.

    Heavy accumulations of ice can topple trees, communications towers and snap power lines. It can take several days for power and communications to be restored. Bridges and overpasses will freeze before other surfaces making for slippery road conditions.

    Milkweed pods and winter berries
    Plants in Winter

    Plants go dormant during the cold winter. It is a good time to to identify tree twigs and winter seed heads.Some plants remain standing during winter. These plants are most often alien invaders that thrive in areas where human building has disturbed the natural ecosystems. The winter standing plants are often tough customers like thistle, burdock, chicory and goldenrod. Now is a great time to go out and quickly sketch or snap pictures of these roadside “weeds”. The Stokes Guide to Nature in Winter by Donald and Lillian Stokes is my all-time favorite ecology and identification guide to nature study in winter.

    Why not learn the difference between evergreen trees? Evergreens (or conifers) are trees which keep their thick green leaves throughout winter. Evergreens are trees like spruce, pine and fir. If you have a Christmas tree during this season it is a good place to start.
    In late winter, tree sap rises and the maple sugaring harvest begins. Late winter is also the time that tree buds begin to swell. Take of notice of which trees buds swell first and all the other conditions that coincide. What is the air temperature? And what else is happening at the same time?

    Chickadee


    Animals in Winter

    Most birds flew to warmer regions. But, there are about 30 which stay through out the winter. Many of these birds will come to your winter feeding stations. These birds can live off the foods sources that are available. They tend to eat insects eggs, hibernating insects and seeds. The scavengers, like crows, pigeons and gulls eat anything they can stomach. The hunters, hawks and owls, of course eat their prey.

    Winter is a good time to look for abandoned nests of birds, squirrels and other animals. Learning bird vocalizations and calls during the winter months is easier with so few birds around.

    Winter is the time of sleep for many animals. Turtles, wood frogs and spotted salamanders burrow deep into the mud to hibernate. Woodchucks and chipmunks sleep the winter away snug in their burrows As do earthworms and insects such cecropia moths, woolly caterpillars and bumble bees. Bears sleep, but awaken easily during winter. Their body temperature doesn’t drop like other animals which are considered true hibernators.
    During hibernation, animals are in a state of suspended animation.
    Many mammals stay active throughout the winter. Winter animal signs are evidence of their activity.

    • some fish are active all winter.
    • muskrats, otters and beavers
    • weasels, ermines and
    • deer
    • snowshoe hares and rabbits,
    • skunks, raccoons and porcupines
    • foxes
    • mice
    • red and gray squirrels – they stay in nests during bad weather and feed on buried stores of food

    Winter in the city


    Winter is a quiet season without the flash and constant action of summer. But is wondrous in its own right. Nature in winter has many mysteries to unravel. Winter is the perfect time to start nature study or a winter nature journal. And fill that winter nature journal with photos using winter photography tips.


    Last edited by Aisti-; Jun 23, 2013 at 01:08 AM.

  4. #4
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    Antarctica: Animal Printouts




    Antarctica, the frozen continent surrounding the Earth's South Pole, and the frigid seas surrounding it, are home to many animals. In particular, the Antarctic seas are teeming with life, ranging from microscopic plankton to the biggest animal that ever lived on Earth, the Blue whale.

    Antarctica is the coldest, windiest, and driest place on Earth. The coldest temperature ever recorded on Earth was in Antarctica; it went down to approximately -129°F (-89°C)! The Antarctic land does not support many life forms. Most of the land of Antarctica is a frozen desert, with less precipitation than the Sahara Desert (under 2 inches = 5 cm a year). Oddly enough, 70% of the world's fresh water is frozen in the region of the South Pole.

    All of the Antarctic animals have adapted to life in extremely cold conditions. Some, like the whales, seals, and birds, have an insulating layer of fat to protect them from the cold. Others, like many fish and insects, have special chemicals in their blood (natural antifreeze proteins) that keep them from freezing. Many animals (like penguins and seals) have a compact body form and thick skin to help retain body heat. Birds also have waterproof plumage (feathers) and downy insulating feathers.

    Some animals leave Antarctica during its horrendous coldest months, from June until August. Animals like the Humpback whale migrate to warmer waters to reproduce after eating huge amount of krill in Antarctic waters. Many other animals (like the Emperor penguin) remain in the Antarctic year-round.

    Land and sea animals from Antarctica include:

    • Crustaceans - krill (euphausiids), copepods, amphipods, isopods, crabs, shrimp, sea spiders, and many others
    • Other marine invertebrates - squid, cuttle-fish, octopus, marine snails, limpets, sponges, sea stars, sea squirts, nudibranchs, sea anemones, comb jellies, corals, hydroids, sea urchins,Antarctic krill, zooplankton, and many others
    • Insects and Arachnids - Springtails, mites, the midge Parochlus steineni (the only winged insect native to the Antarctic), and others
    • Fish - Antarctic cod, ice fish, crocodile fish, dragon fish, robber fish, rat-tailed fish, skates, eel-pouts, sea snails, and others
    • Mammals - Fur seals (including the Elephant seal, Leopard seal, Weddell seal, Crabeater seal, Ross seal, and Fur seal), Whales (including the Blue whale, Fin whale, Sei whale, Southern right whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, Sperm whale, Killer whale or Orca, Southern bottlenose whale, Blackfish, Dusky dolphin, Cruciger dolphin, and Spectacled porpoise)
    • Birds - many penguins (including Emperor, King, Macaroni, Rockhopper, Chinstrap, Adélie, and Gentoo), many albatrosses (including the Lightly-maned sooty, Wandering, Gray-headed and Black-browed), many petrels (including the Blue, Kerguelen, Gray, Great-winged, White-headed, White-chinned, Snow, Southern giant, Wilson's storm, Black-bellied storm, Gray-backed storm, and pintado), many prions (including the dove, fulmar, and thin-billed), Antarctic fulmar, Antarctic cormorant Kerguelen cormorant, Dominican gull, Brown skua, McCormick's skua, Arctic tern, Kerguelen tern, Wattled sheathbill, Lesser sheathbill, South Georgia pintail, Kerguelen pintail, and South Georgia pipit (the only Antarctic songbird).


    (Source: Enchanted Learning)

    Last edited by Aisti-; Jun 24, 2013 at 10:42 PM.

  5. #5
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    Arctic Animals

    The Arctic:

    The Arctic is a very cold, windy, and often snowy biome located around the North Pole. When referring to the Arctic, people usually mean the part of the earth within the Arctic Circle (an imaginary circle around the Earth, parallel to the Equator and 23 degrees 28 minutes from the North Pole, that is, above about 75 degrees North Latitude). Although there is no land at the North Pole, the icy Arctic Ocean is teeming with life ranging from the microscopic (like zooplankton) to the huge (like whales).

    There is also a lot of land within the Arctic Circle (northern parts of Asia, Europe, and North America). Land within the Arctic Circle is tundra, and it supports less life most other biomes because of the cold temperatures, strong, dry winds, and permafrost (permanently-frozen soil). Long periods of darkness (in the winter) and light (in the summer) also affect Arctic life.

    Arctic Land Zones:

    The most extreme Arctic land (the closest to the North Pole) is called the High Arctic Zone; this polar desert supports very little animal or plant life (less than 5 percent of the land area is covered with vegetation) due to a very short, dry growing season, dry air, permafrost, poor soils, and a lack of pollinating insects. The warmer Arctic region is called the Low Arctic Zone. This area supports more life, with more than 90 percent of the land area covered with hardy, cold-and-dry-adapted vegetation.

    Arctic Animals:

    Animals that live in the Arctic (either full time or seasonally) are adapted to extreme conditions. Many animals who overwinter in the Arctic (like the Arctic fox and the ermine) have a coat that thickens and changes color to white during the winter as camouflage in the snow (blending into the background is called cryptic coloration).

    Some animals hibernate during the cold season; they go into a very deep, sleep-like state in which their heartbeat slows down. These animals often hibernate in an underground burrow or pit. Some hibernators include skunks, chipmunks, and some bears (but these bears are not true hibernators, they go into a state that is closer to a normal deep sleep).

    Many animals (like the Arctic tern) spend the summer months in the Arctic, but leave as the weather turns frigid and food becomes scarce (these animals return again the next summer, repeating this pattern year after year). This behavior is called migrating.

    (Source: Enchanted Learning)


    Last edited by Aisti-; Jun 24, 2013 at 11:15 PM.

  6. #6
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    Weather Vocabulary Word List

    A
    accumulation
    advisory
    air
    air mass
    air pollution
    air pressure
    almanac
    altocumulus
    altostratus
    anemometer
    atmosphere
    atmospheric pressure
    aurora
    autumn
    avalanche
    B
    balmy
    barometer
    barometric pressure
    Beaufort wind scale
    biosphere
    black ice
    blizzard
    blustery
    breeze
    C
    calm
    cell
    chinook wind
    cirriform
    cirrus
    climate
    climatology
    cloud
    cloud bank
    cloudburst
    cloudy
    cold
    cold front
    cold snap
    cold wave
    compass
    condensation
    contrail
    convergence
    cumuliform
    cumulonimbus
    cumulus
    current
    cyclone
    cyclonic flow
    D
    degree
    depression
    dew
    dew point
    disturbance
    doldrums
    downburst
    downdraft
    downpour
    downwind
    drift
    D cont.
    drifting snow
    drizzle
    drought
    dry
    dust devil
    duststorm
    E
    earthlight
    easterlies
    eddy
    EF-scale
    El Niño
    emergency radio
    evaporation
    eye
    eye wall
    F
    fair
    fall
    feeder bands
    firewhirl
    flash flood
    flood
    flood stage
    flurry
    fog
    fog bank
    forecast
    freeze
    freezing rain
    front
    frost
    Fujita scale
    funnel cloud
    G
    gale
    global warming
    graupel
    greenhouse effect
    ground fog
    gully washer
    gust
    gustnado
    H
    haboob
    hail
    halo
    haze
    heat
    heat index
    heat wave
    high
    humid
    humidity
    hurricane
    hurricane season
    hydrologic cycle
    hydrology
    hydrometer
    hydrosphere
    hygrometer
    I
    ice
    ice age
    ice crystals
    ice pellets
    ice storm
    icicle
    inversion
    isobar
    isotherm
    J
    jet stream
    K
    Kelvin
    knot
    L
    lake effect
    land breeze
    landfall
    landspout
    leeward
    lightning
    low
    low clouds
    low pressure system
    M
    macroburst
    mammatus cloud
    meteorologist
    meteorology
    microburst
    mist
    mistral wind
    moisture
    monsoon
    muggy
    N
    National Hurricane Center (NHC)
    National Weather Service (NWC)
    NEXRAD
    nimbus
    nimbostratus
    nor'easter
    normal
    nowcast
    O
    orographic cloud
    outflow
    outlook
    overcast
    ozone
    P
    parhelion
    partly cloudy
    permafrost
    pileus cloud
    polar
    polar front
    pollutant
    precipitation
    pressure
    prevailing wind
    R
    radar
    radiation
    rain
    rainbands
    rainbow
    rain gauge
    rain shadow
    relative humidity
    ridge
    rope tornado
    S
    sandstorm
    Santa Ana wind
    scattered
    sea breeze
    shower
    sky
    sleet
    slush
    smog
    smoke
    snow
    snowfall
    snowflake
    snow flurry
    snow level
    snow line
    snow shower
    snowsquall
    snowstorm
    spring
    squall
    squall line
    stationary front
    steam
    St. Elmo's fire
    storm
    storm surge
    storm tracks
    stratosphere
    stratocumulus
    stratus
    subtropical
    summer
    sun dog
    sun pillar
    sunrise
    sunset
    supercell
    surge
    swell
    T
    temperate
    temperature
    thaw
    thermal
    thermometer
    thunder
    thunderstorm
    T cont.
    tornado
    tornado alley
    trace
    triple point
    tropical
    tropical depression
    tropical disturbance
    tropical storm
    tropical wave
    Tropic of Cancer
    Tropic of Capricorn
    troposphere
    trough
    turbulence
    twilight
    twister
    typhoon
    U
    unstable
    updraft
    upwelling
    upwind
    V
    vapor
    vapor trail
    visibility
    vortex
    W
    wall cloud
    warm
    warning
    watch
    water
    water cycle
    waterspout
    wave
    weather
    weather balloon
    weathering
    weather map
    weather satellite
    weathervane
    wedge
    westerlies
    whirlwind
    whiteout
    wind
    wind chill
    wind chill factor
    wind shear
    windsock
    wind vane
    winter
    Z
    zone

    (Source: Enchanted Learning)

    Last edited by Aisti-; Jun 25, 2013 at 12:02 AM.

  7. #7
    ESE Instructor Aisti-'s Avatar
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    Adjectives

    Adjectives can be classified into many categories. In English, adjectives are generally used in the order: quantity-->opinion-->size-->age-->shape-->color-->origin-->material-->purpose. Some of these categories are (roughly in the order in which adjectives are used in English):
    • quantity - few, no, one, two, three, four, little, several, many, all, some, every, each, ...
    • opinion - good, better, best, bad, worse, worst, wonderful, splendid, mediocre, awful, fantastic, pretty, ugly, clean, dirty, wasteful, difficult, comfortable, uncomfortable, valuable, worthy, worthless, useful, useless, important, evil, angelic, rare, scarce, poor, rich, lovely, disgusting, amazing, surprising, loathesome, unusual, usual, pointless, pertinent, ...
    • personality/emotion - happy, sad, excited, scared, frightened, outgoing, funny, sad, zany, grumpy, cheerful, jolly, carefree, quick-witted, blissful, lonely, elated, ...
    • sound - loud, soft, silent, vociferous, screaming, shouting, thunderous, blaring, quiet, noisy, talkative, rowdy, deafening, faint, muffled, mute, speechless, whispered, hushed, ...
    • taste - sweet, sour, acidic, bitter, salty, tasty, delicious, savory, delectable, yummy, bland, tasteless, palatable, yummy, luscious, appetizing, tasteless, spicy, watery, ...
    • touch - hard, soft, silky, velvety, bumpy, smooth, grainy, coarse, pitted, irregular, scaly, polished, glossy, lumpy, wiry, scratchy, rough, glassy, ...
    • size, weight - heavy, light, big, small, little, tiny, tall, short, fat, thin, slender, willowy, lean, svelte, scrawny, skeletal, underweight, lanky, wide, enormous, huge, vast, great, gigantic, monstrous, mountainous, jumbo, wee, dense, weighty, slim, trim, hulking, hefty, giant, plump, tubby, obese, portly, ...
    • smell - perfumed, acrid, putrid, burnt, smelly, reeking, noxious, pungent, aromatic, fragrant, scented, musty, sweet-smelling,...
    • speed - quick, fast, slow, speeding, rushing, bustling, rapid, snappy, whirlwind, swift, hasty, prompt, brief, ...
    • temperature - hot, cold, freezing, icy, frigid, sweltering, wintry, frosty, frozen, nippy, chilly, sizzling, scalding, burning, feverish, fiery, steaming, ...
    • age - young, old, baby, babyish, teenage, ancient, antique, old-fashioned, youthful, elderly, mature, adolescent, infantile, bygone, recent, modern, ...
    • distance - short, long, far, distant, nearby, close, faraway, outlying, remote, far-flung, neighboring, handy, ...
    • shape - round, circular, square, triangular, oval, sleek, blobby, flat, rotund, globular, spherical, wavy, straight, cylindrical, oblong, elliptical, zigzag, squiggly, crooked, winding, serpentine, warped, distorted, ...
    • miscellaneous qualities- full, empty, wet, dry, open, closed , ornate, ...
    • brightness - light, dark, bright, shadowy, drab, radiant, shining, pale, dull, glowing, shimmering, luminous, gleaming, ...
    • color - pink, red, orange, yellowish, dark-green, blue, purple, black, white, gray, brown, tanned, pastel, metallic, silver, colorless, transparent, translucent, ...
    • time - early, late, morning, night, evening, everlasting, initial, first, last, overdue, belated, long-term, delayed, punctual, ...
    • origin/location - lunar, northern, oceanic, polar, equatorial, Floridian, American, Spanish, Canadian, Mexican, French, Irish, English, Australian, ...
    • material - glass, wooden, cloth, concrete, fabric, cotton, plastic, leather, ceramic, china, metal, steel, silicon, ...
    • purpose - folding, swinging, work, racing, cooking, sleeping, dance, rolling, walking, ...

    (Source: Enchanted Learning)