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z bebamboo z
Oct 30, 2007, 06:52 AM
• Writing and Editing are two separate, and different processes.
• Writing and Editing are two separate, and different processes. It is that important.
• Write first. Edit later.
• Write first. Edit later. It is that important.
• Outline only if it works for you.
• Write every day.
• Write what you want to read, not what you think someone else will.
• Keep a ritual.
• Stick to it.
• When you are not writing, read.
• Read a lot.
• Read everything: comics, newspapers, novels, magazines, screenplays, poetry, billboards, tattoos, mustard wrappers, everything.
• Read your own writing. Out loud.
• Read other people’s writing. Out loud.
• Don’t read to comprehend. This is about writing.
• Read to write. Notice the context, flow, and tone.
• Listen to people speak.
• Don’t listen to comprehend. This is about writing.
• Notice the context, flow, and tone.
• Write with different tools: keyboard, pencil, ink pen, crayon, dirt, whatever.
• Write on different mediums: grid paper, lined paper, blank paper, cardboard, LCD, canvas, dirt, whatever.
• Write in different places, but keep and maintain a Writing Home.
• Tell everyone you write: your family, your friends, the postman, the garbage man, everyone.
• But don’t tell anyone exactly what you are writing: not even the garbage man.
• And write every day.

dhmt3
Nov 3, 2007, 07:35 AM
“When you are not writing, read.
Read a lot.
Read everything: comics, newspaper, novels, magazines, screenplays, poetry, billboards, tattoos, mustard, wrappers, everything.
Read your own writing. Out loud.
Don’t read to comprehend. This is about writing.
Read to write. Notice the context, flow, and tone.
Listen to people speak.
Don’t listen to comprehend. This is about writing.
Notice the context, flow, and tone.”

It is so true. Reading, writing, and editing are more important than most people think.

When I was in college, I hated English classes. Like every engineering student, I laughed at those who majored in English, especially when the job prospect of an English graduate was nowhere near engineering’s. Despite the moaning and groaning of engineering students, the curriculum required them to take three English composition classes, three English literature classes, and two business communication classes. Because I did not attend high school in the US, I was forced to take an extra year of English. I had so many credits in English that I graduated with a minor in the most-hated subject – English. I thought I was good in English with the minor and all, but I was wrong.

I’d never felt so ashamed when I was asked to write a report to our company’s headquarters, after two years working as a design engineer. Since the report was important, my supervisor wanted to review it before sending it out. Within an hour, I received the report back from the boss. My face must have been so red because I felt like having a fever. I quietly stared at his red-marks on every other sentence in the first half of the report. My boss had given up correcting the second half. He politely asked me to write it again, and told his administrative assistant to “assist” me.

From that day, my attitude toward English has changed. I boxed away all my precious Kiếm Hiệp storybooks, and started to read American novels. A friend recommended Clive Cussler’s novels. Within the first couple hours of reading “Cyclops”, I was hooked. I then read every Dirk Pitt adventure novel, written by Clive Cussler. While waiting for new books to be published, I went through almost every novel from Ken Follett, John Grisham, Michael Crichton, Tom Clancy, James Patterson, Nelson DeMille, Leonard Scott, and many more. I also attended a local university and took every business English class that the school offered at night.

I think my writing has improved over the years. However, when I don’t pay attention, I would make many mistakes again. Sometimes, I can get real wordy.

Recently, Miss Bamboo promoted a writing class. I’ve written many technical reports and official documents, but I haven’t written essays on non-technical topics since my last English class from college. Therefore, I decided to join her class and worked on the assignments. Last June, I started with my first essay “When We Met Again”. I thought it was all right until today. Miss Bamboo’s post motivated me to take a second look, and guess what, I was blushed with embarrassment. I didn’t make many mistakes in grammar or punctuation, but the essay was extremely wordy. I have written it with my Vietnamese mentality. The sentences were long, complex, and choppy. I guess after few more assignments, I’d get better.

Writing in English is not difficult. As long as we have an idea, and are willing to take time to read, review, and edit, we’d be OK. I believe that I would master the task one day.

Now, speaking English is a totally different matter… I think I need a speech therapist.

Handsome Bear
Nov 22, 2007, 02:26 AM
"Write with different tools: keyboard, pencil, ink pen, crayon, dirt, whatever.
Write on different mediums: grid paper, lined paper, blank paper, cardboard, LCD, canvas, dirt, whatever.
Write in different places, but keep and maintain a Writing Home.
Tell everyone you write: your family, your friends, the postman, the garbage man, everyone.
But don’t tell anyone exactly what you are writing: not even the garbage man.
And write every day."


Or you can write crazy thing about crazy English such as this:
(Excerpted from Richard Lederer's website (http://pw1.netcom.com/~rlederer/))


---------------------------------------------------


Let's face it -- English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England nor French fries in France. Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat.

We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square, and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why it is that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth beeth? If you have one goose, two geese, why not one moose, two meese, or one index, two indices?

Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend, or that you can comb through the annals of history but not a single annal? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? If you wrote a letter, perhaps you bote your tongue?
Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what other language do people recite at a play and play at a recital; ship by truck and send cargo by ship; have noses that run and feet that smell; park on driveways and drive on parkways?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and wise guy are opposites, and quite a lot and quite a few are alike? How can the weather be hot as hell one day and cold as hell another?

Have you noticed that we talk about certain things only when they are absent? Have you ever seen a horsefull carriage or a strapfull gown; met a sung hero or experienced requited love; have you ever run into someone who was combobulated, gruntled, or peccable? And where are all those people who ARE spring chickens or who would ACTUALLY hurt a fly?

You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which an alarm clock goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race (which of course, isn't a race at all). That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when they lights are out, they are invisible. And why, when I wind up my watch, I start it, but when I wind up this essay, I end it?

:thankyou:

blue_moons_1
Dec 5, 2007, 06:10 AM
Hi all:salute:. Moon would like to share something Moon knows from about writing. Moon hope it will give you some ideas about how to make an effective paragraph.
A

There are five things you need to have for an effective paragraph:

_ Topic sentence

_Controlling idea

_Supporting details

_Transitions

_Conclusion.



This is an example for an effective paragraph:



(1)There are various steps to constructing an effective paragraph. (2)First,you must brainstorm and select ideas.(3)Next, you use the topic sentence with a controlling idea.(4)Then you should add supporting sentences that relate to your topic sentence.(5) After you have written your topic sentence and supporting details, you must end with a concluding sentence.(6) Finally,editing your paragraph is a vital step.(7) Using these steps to writing a paragraph will certainly make your teacher very pleased.



(1) is topic sentence and controlling idea.

(2), (3), (4),(5),(6) are the supporting details.

(7) is the conclusion.

"first", "next", "then", "after", "finally" are transitions



B

What must you consider before you write your paragraph?

1- Purpose :

a) To inform

b) To persuade

c) To entertain



2- Audience :

a) Person (first / second /or third)

b)Formal or informal



3- Clarity :

a) Use descriptive ( or precise) words

b) Use clear pronoun references



4-Unity :

Unity in a paragraph means that all the sentences are related to the topic sentence and its controlling idea. Good writers stay on topic by making sure that each supporting detail sentence relates to the topic sentence.



5- Coherence:

a) Logical order

b) Repetition of keys words

c) Use of transitional words and phrases



Now you're ready for an effective paragraph....Let's go..Good luck :thankyou:

Handsome Bear
Dec 6, 2007, 03:35 AM
Every part of an essay has its own function. They are equally important to the readers. However, I would pay extra attention to the introduction and the conclusion. I believe that the readers would not read my essay if my introduction doesn’t intrigue them. They probably wouldn’t remember much about my essay if the conclusion doesn’t stick in their mind.

To me, the introduction and the conclusion of an essay are essential, whether they are for a simple composition essay or a complex graduation thesis.

There are several ways to write an introduction and a conclusion. There is no right or wrong way because creative writing depends mostly on your creativity and imagination. Below are just a few guides that I have learned and would like to share (English Sharing Experience, get it? :smile_yes:).

Part I – Introduction
I can think of 6 ways to write an introduction, or an opening, to an essay: 1) Thesis Statement Opening, 2) Opening with a Story, 3) Specific Detail Opening, 4) Open with a Quotation, 5) Open with a factual statement or Statistic, and 6) Question Opening.

Thesis Statement Opening
This is a most typical style of opening. It summarizes what you are going to tell the readers in your essay.
For example:
English Sharing Experience (ESE) is a non-traditional classroom where friends from all over the world come to share their experiences with learning English. ESE was formed by a group of young Vietnamese men and women who faced and understood the difficulties in learning English. They rely on Paltalk, which offers free audio and video chat through the Internet, to teach English to Vietnamese. ESE instructors teach pronunciation, conversation, vocabulary, and grammar. Sometimes, they also teach English love poems to satisfy the hopelessly romantic blood instilled in every Vietnamese.

Opening with a Story
A good story catches readers’ attention. It sets the tone for the essay. It relaxes the readers and makes them feel comfortable.
For example:
Little Handsome Bear put on his swimming suit. He couldn't wait to see his Uncle Bear. When the uncle arrived, Handsome Bear ran to him and said, “Uncle, Mother Bear said you drank like a fish. You must have been a good swimmer.” (An opening to discuss English idioms)

Specific Detail Opening
Giving specific details about a subject triggers the readers’ curiosity and provides a visual effect for the essay.
For example:
The microphone was picked up but all we could hear was the giggles. She went on giggling for about five minutes. From the video screen, we could see that her face was all red and was partially covered with strands of silky long black hairs. Her shoulders were vibrating. Her mouth opened wide showing two perfect rows of beautiful white teeth. Miss BBB couldn’t stop giggling. She must have been so happy. :hysterical:

Open with a quotation
This usually invites a discussion. It prepares the reader for the subject that is going to be discussed in the essay.
For example:
“Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country,” President Kennedy said as millions of American cheered loudly during his inaugural address in 1961. The phrase has become the most quoted sentence in every motivation speech from military commanders before sending their soldiers to war. :salute:

Open with a factual statement or statistic
Fact or statistic builds credit to what we are going to talk about.
For example:
University of Utah psychologists have published a study showing that motorists who talk on cell phones while driving are as impaired as drunken drivers. If legislators really want to address driver distraction problems, they should consider outlawing cell-phone use while driving.* (An opening to discuss the danger of talking on a cell phone while driving)

* this is only an example, and the study may not be accurate :unsure:

Question Opening
This is an effective opening. It creates an interactive reaction from the readers as they try to answer the question. It may also be the questions that the readers may ask when they see the topic of the essay.
For example:
“One thousand years from now, when the ice from the Antarctica would melt, and water would cover 95% of the earth, would human become mermaid?” Darwin would have raised such question if he were alive today.


Part II – Conclusion (to be continued someday ...)


:thankyou:

ThanksForTeachingMe
Apr 14, 2009, 04:50 PM
Part II – Conclusion (to be continued someday ...)


Chờ lâu quá, nhìn thời gian đã gần 2 năm rồi. Please continue ... :)

Thanks4all
Sep 11, 2011, 11:50 AM
Chờ lâu quá, nhìn thời gian đã gần 2 năm rồi. Please continue ... :)


Is this closed??

candy_29_09
Oct 22, 2011, 03:30 PM
update pls